A Travellerspoint blog

Sunny Days

These are the moments we will forever continue to live for.

sunny 32 °C

I write to you today as I relax in true Cambodian fashion. Beach side, my back is swallowing warm rays of Khmer sunshine while the soft sand exfoliates my skin and I'm finding myself drifting away to the sweet lullaby of the Gulf of Thailand.
Allow me to take you back a day, to the events that led me to my tropical haven...

This weekend started off with a boat ride along the coast of Phnom Penh, enjoying cool, refreshing cocktails and a riverside view of the city lights, the palace standing center stage. The boat ride preceded a BBQ dinner for our entire TEFL class where we celebrated the completion of training and shared goodbyes with the half of the group bound for Thailand. We ate, sang karaoke until our throats were sore at a lounge that happened to be featuring 'lady-boy' night, so we got the chance to witness quite a show! The following morning, we that had not left for Thailand took off on a road trip of our own, to Sihanoukville, a beach surrounded by private islands in the Gulf of Thailand.

milkshakes on the beach

milkshakes on the beach

Our first day in Sihanoukville, we took a private boat ride, island hopping, snorkeling and fishing. The gulf waters are clear and the waves are timid, gently kissing the sandy beaches and allowing for a day of smooth sailing. At one island in particular, we were given the opportunity to hike through the jungle from the west beach to the east beach. On our journey, we came across a group of monks on holiday. They were all very excited to see us and each whipped out his own cell phone in order to take his turn getting a photo with us. Monks in Cambodia are not like any monks I have ever imagined. They ride Tuk Tuks, smoke, talk on cell phones, and can even come into contact with girls. I have learned that most monks here only serve as monks for 2-3 years so that they can be sent to University for free. Typically, it is an economic endeavor for these young men.
After we passed the monks, we ventured deeper into the jungle, following a winding path. A high pitched, siren-like noise from the canopy above filled our ears, as though the jungle were warning us to turn back. We did not heed this warning and pressed on until we came to a clearing which opened up to the most secluded, breathtakingly glamourous beach I have ever laid my eyes upon. We ran towards the water, stripping off our outer layers as we neared the shore, and dove into the crystal clear, bath-warm water.

snorkeling time

snorkeling time

Fish Kisses

Fish Kisses

Many of the smaller islands are surrounded by coral reefs that play host to a myriad of colorful fish, corals and plant life. One of the girls, Wendy, even saw a hermit crab fighting with an aggravated sea urchin. We didn't stick around long enough to see the outcome of the battle, though my money was on the sea urchin. They don't look like the kind of creature I would want to cross paths with. Very territorial and what have you. After a short snorkeling adventure (I am rather squeamish in large bodies of water), I took refuge at the bow of the boat, claimed an empty water bottle rigged with a fishing line and hook, baited the hook with fresh squid, and dropped my line. My patience resulted in the catch of a single fish no bigger than the palm of my hand. Nonetheless, I was very proud. We finished our boat trip with a seafood BBQ on the beach and prepped for the night that lie ahead of us.

island jungle

island jungle

Around 6:00 PM, half of the group returned to the hotel as the rest of us, Maggie, Kim, Evin, Emily and myself, bid the tired sun "sweet dreams" and made toasts to new friends, relaxation, adventure and a weekend to remember. We set off into the night and danced under the light of a full moon until it was time for the sun and moon to switch places once again. The island music played boisterously, dusk until dawn and we never missed a beat. Flame throwers spun fiery batons on risers scattered across the beach. The gulf tide crashed dangerously onto the rocky coastline and billions of stars painted a luminescent glow upon the rippling waters. We moved energetically to the steady challenge of the drum and bass until we could physically move no longer. At the breaking point, we all found ourselves drawn to the cool and inviting pool waters of the temple-bar, Utopia. With shoes cast aside, we sat on the pool's edge with our feet dangling in the water. Until the sky was consumed by light once more, we sat and debated all of the trials and mysteries of life with new friends and strangers alike. By the time the music stopped, the pool waters were suspiciously warm and had a taken on a brown murky hue. We said our farewells to the rest of the pool party and set off to procure nourishment in order to appease the angry demands of our hungry stomachs.

After breakfast, the three of us took a Tuk Tuk back to the hotel, slipped into our bathing suits and found ourselves on a quiet beach. I ordered a fresh banana milkshake for myself and within a moments time, local beach workers were approaching my side offering massages, manicures, pedicures and threading (which I was shamefully told I need in more places than a few). How could I resist? I allowed one lady to give me a full body massage while another threaded my eyebrows. After an hour, Maggie got her own threading done, and I cooled off with an ocean swim.
It is now 11:30 and the responsibilities of real life are soon to pull us away from our peaceful oasis. In a few hours time, Sihanoukville will fall further and further behind us as we drive back toward Phnom Penh. This weekend was a well deserved and most appreciated vacation in every sense of the term, but tomorrow we begin teaching,thus beginning the next big chapter of my life.

Posted by Abroadabroad89 04:59 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

Tarantulas, Temples, TEFL Training, Tuk Tuks and Toilets.

“People travel to faraway places to watch, in fascination, the kind of people they ignore at home.” – Dagobert D. Runes

sunny 34 °C

I have been in Cambodia for two weeks now. TEFL training is going well, jet lag is behind me, I am becoming much more acclimated to the food (I have the pamelo fruit to thank for that) and I have even been back to Siem Reap to revisit the marvelous Angkor temples and city ruins and spend a little more time enjoying the Expat-adored Pub Street where we had a wonderful Cambodian dinner and followed it with market shopping, fish pedicures -(yes, Mom, i actually stuck my feet in that disgusting, unsanitary water) and some nightlife.

TEFL crew Nov. 2011

TEFL crew Nov. 2011

It is slightly mind-boggling to think about the fact that in less than a month's time, I am going to be a certified teacher, off to spend the next year spreading knowledge to children in China. TEFL Training has been a wonderful experience and I do feel I have learned a great deal. We take a Tuk Tuk to and from class everyday. Essentially, it is a glorified taxi; a carriage pulled by a motorbike. Riding in a Tuk Tuk through the traffic-ridden streets of Phnom Penh is the best way to have your lungs filled with engine exhaust. When it came to meeting our instructors, our first teacher, a Vietnam veteran who has been living in South East Asia since the 1970s, waited until he was 7 Jack and Cokes in before introducing himself at the orientation dinner, and our second teacher walked into class day one (as well as every day after that) barefoot, wearing swim trunks and a polo. Class days have consisted of lectures, student presentations and engaging activities. We did spend a couple days on relearning every English grammar rule our elementary and middle school teacher tried to teach us and we failed to retain, which i could have gladly done without, but regardless the entire experience has been fun and exciting. My fellow trainees are a great bunch. Everyone of us has come into this with separate backgrounds, each bringing our own, unique personalities and experiences together in the pursuit of a common goal. It has been delightful getting to know everyone, and 'good-byes' will be difficult as we all part to go on to our separate teaching posts (some in China, others in Cambodia and Thailand, and one girl going off on her own, to Vietnam), but at the same time, I am anxious to be in China. Cambodia is too hot for me. As much as i enjoy tropical weather, I require season change, and can only handle daily 100 degree weather with 96 percent humidity for so long. I got enough of that during DC's tortuous summer, and I am now ready for some crisp cool air. I finally booked my flight this evening and my passport arrived from DC via Fedex this morning with all of the necessary visa requirements taken care of. Such a relief!

Tuk Tuk rides

Tuk Tuk rides

Siem Reap was a fun time. It was nice to see the ancient temples again, because I spent more time exploring and less time listening to the history with my eyes behind a camera lens. I even got to see a new temple, which has been the coolest one by far, as it has not been recovered, so all of the old stones are just scattered in heaps on the ground, covered in moss with old vines growing across the walls and door frames. We took the bus to get to the city which took about 7 hours. The ride was bumpy, making me realize how much I took for granted and now miss VA's smooth highways. I will never again complain about what a pain I-95 is. Nor will I ever go anywhere again without a roll of toilet paper on hand, because we made a few rest-stops on the way, and I learned that finding it in any public bathroom in South East Asia is a luxury few have the opportunity to enjoy. Worse, most toilets are actually holes in the floor with tiny steps on each side for foot placement. The sorority squat came in hand for these. I have also noticed that in many cases, even when there is a Western-style toilet, most of the seats have footprints on them anyways, because the locals just assumed they are higher steps to squat on. Seriously.
I spent most of the long drive reading, and we all partook in the sharing of Jack and coke mixers as well as some red wine and crackers with cheese. We like to keep it classy on the country roads of Cambodia. Half way through the trip, we stopped on the side of the road at a large rest stop where we were swarmed by vultures. Children selling fruit and bracelets, whose parents had forced them out onto the street to put on sad, pathetic faces and gain the sympathy of the foolish Americans with fat wallets. They are all trained the same one-liners, and are experts at forced crying. I personally did not buy any of the fruit. I did however buy a BBQed tarantula that I thought would make a good pre-dinner snack. I thought wrong, but am happy for the experience.

BBQ'ed Tarantula

BBQ'ed Tarantula

I am starting to feel slightly homesick, missing life and people (and of course my puppies) back in the states, but life here is keeping me pretty distracted. I hope everyone is well!

As for me, I'll keep y'all posted! Xo

Posted by Abroadabroad89 07:57 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

Oh My Buddha

"Let me reassure that the Kingdom of Cambodia a country with independence, neutrality, peace, freedom, democracy and human rights as you all have seen, shall be existing with no end." Hun Sen

sunny 31 °C

So, I have been in English Teaching training for a week now and thus far I am feeling very confident about the upcoming year. It is fascinating to me that after only 2 weeks of training, I am expected to be proficient in what some spend five years of grad school preparing for.

Each day of TESOL training class is a new adventure. With new presentations and explorations, I have learned what it feels like to be on the teacher end of the student-teacher paradigm. Suddenly I understand why my teachers made me sit next to kids I didn't know, and participate in practice activities that at the time seemed futile. We have practiced speech, and group activities, as well as reading and writing practice, and also modeling. It has been interesting to watch such a dynamic group work together towards a common goal/interest.

Tomorrow, we have our first test. It should take us about two hours and will cover grammer and pronunciation. Important topics, which we discussed in full over the past two weeks, that otherwise took me years of middle and high school to get a firm grasp on. There are so many parts of a sentence that it actually makes me sick (though, the sick feeling may just have something to do with the 'whiskey bucket' I just shared with 3 other aspiring English teachers at a restaurant called, "The Laughing Fat Man"). Each word has it's own grammatical label; Auxiliaries, adverbials, determiners, etc. It is enough to make one dizzy in the head.

following the test, we are all to board a bus destined for Siem Reap. This is where all of the ancient temples (which I visited last week) are located. I am excited to be returning, because there is so much to see and experience, that one trip just doesn't cover it. I guess it is like watching a movie - you see so much more, the second or third viewing.

I really am looking forward to the weekend vacation. We have been working so hard in class that a break will be most appreciated. Our hotel is to have an outdoor swimming pool, and our neighbors have a crocodile farm, which means crocodile feast (if everyone is into it)!

I shall post more once the vacation has come to a close. I am missing home, just a little bit, but excited for all of the adventures that await me in China. ...I guess I am just getting bored with Khmer (Cambodian) lifestyle and heat, and looking forward to thrilling China!

Posted by Abroadabroad89 09:39 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

A sobering day

"It was like living among a pack of wolves who did not understand the nature of man; who hated man" -Khmer rouge victim

A warning for anyone about to read this: It depicts gruesome, horrific scenes  of genocide and violence and may not be easy to stomach.

It is the final day of our trip and we are in Phnom Penh. We started our morning off at the Genocide Museum, Tuol Sleng, located at the former S.21 prison, used by the Ultra Communist Khmer Rouge in Cambodia as a torture prison in the late 70s.

Quick history lesson: The Khmer Rouge was a resistance group developed in the Cambodian jungle during the time of French Colonialism in Cambodia.  They were one of many gorilla groups at the time, but when the French agreed to leave Cambodia in 1953, giving the nation it's independence, the Khmer Rouge, made of of men, women and young boys and girls alike, did not stop growing. After a little over a decade of peace in Cambodia under monarchy rule, In 1970, the Khmer Rouge, now large in size  marched into Phnom Penh from the jungle and rural areas and seized the city, driving out the old King.  They then evacuated the city residents to the rural areas, saying there was a US bomb threat on Phnom Penh.  The people packed their belongings and walked right into a death trap. They were all murdered.  The Khmer Rouge then detained citizens, targeting soldiers of the old regime, elites and intellectuals (including anyone who wore glasses). They detained men, women and children, labeling them as spies and conspirators against the regime.  Their reign of terror lasted until 1979 when Vietnam intervened and drove them out of power. From 1970-1979, approximately 3 million people were killed.

The prison, now only a museum, was mostly kept in it's original state for visitors to come see and feel what being detained there was like.  The original barbed wire was still strung across the tops of the prison walls and in front of balconies (used to keep prisoners from committing suicide).  Each old cell had a single iron bed with a thick chain strapped to it, a rusty bullet box which was used for defecating, and in some rooms, examples of the weapons, spades, shovels, axes, iron rods, knives, etc., that were used for torture. Most of the rooms still had remnants of splattered blood on the ceilings and floors. 
The former administrator building was transformed into a gallery of graphic photography, biographies of victims and torturers  alike.  Pictures that depicted beaten and bruised bodies of the dead lying on floor in puddles of blood. Skeletons with skin.  Snapshots of every prisoner had been taken upon admittance to S.21 and they too had been recovered for the display.  Thousands of faces, young and old, staring back at us as we pressed on through the somber corridors.  More than anything, their expressions reached the deepest parts of me. They were not the faces of hard criminals. They were children, innocent wives and husbands.  Their eyes were afraid and confused, and worse, completely unaware of the horrific fate awaiting them.

I have taken a Soviet train through Auswitz, walked through the abandoned gas chambers of Dachau, stood in the vast fields of Babayar, and visited the devastating Holocaust Museum in D.C. , but none of it prepared me for what followed the S.21 prison.

We got back into our van and drove 12 kilometers into the outskirts of the city.  A drive that would have been terrifically familiar to over 20,000 prisoners, had they lived to recall it.  We arrived at the Choeung Ek killing fields with heavy hearts and silenced tongues.  We walked amongst hundreds of burial sites, some where there bones had been exhumed for preservation, and others which had been left untouched.  We learned that the prisoners had been instructed to dig these sites themselves, not knowing what they were to be used for upon completion; not knowing that the massive holes were to be harboring their bones in short time. 
Due to recent flooding, clothing and small teeth and bone fragments had risen to the surface, right at our feet.  A large tree stood at the center of the site. It has been named, The Killing Tree, and rightfully so, as it had been discovered with splattered stains of blood, brain and hair of babies who's skulls had been smashed against its strong trunk.  Finally, we came to a tall Memorial Charnel which was erected to honor the many dead.  8,000 skulls as well as leg bones, arm bones, jaw bones, pelvic bones and others are house in this memorial behind glass casing, completely open to the public eye. My eyes and cheeks burned ferociously as I stood in front of the display, inches away from thousands who should still be living and breathing today.

There are no limitations to the capabilities of mankind.

Posted by Abroadabroad89 04:16 Archived in Cambodia Comments (1)

A Day to Remember

"An inconvenience is an adventure wrongly considered." GKC

sunny 32 °C

We woke up and headed to the Donlesat Lake, the biggest lake in South East Asia. The rural area surrounding the lake is completely under water due to recent flooding from the rivers and rain, so we were unable to take the van directly to our destination. This did not prove to be much of an obstacle however, as we were simply transferred from the comfort of our van to a small raft, hardly afloat in the murky flood waters. Without question, we teetered on to the raft, Mom, Dad, our guide and myself, and sat down cautiously, remaining as still as humanly possible for fear of dunking not ourselves, but the thousands of dollars of electronic equipment we had on our persons. I had a sneaking suspicion that, were we to tip, Dad might rescue the camera and iPads before thinking twice about Mom or me.

We were on the raft for 15 minutes, crossing the canal and entering small village, submerged in water. Most of the cows in the area had been corralled onto a bridge, though a few unfortunate outcasts were forced to stand in the water for lack of space. People sat in restaurants with their legs knee deep in water and small boats paddled by carrying fruits, baskets, tools, and large lumps of grass which had been gathered from the outer lake and brought back into the village in order to feed the cows. The overflow of water has prevented the local cows from being able to eat so most of them look like they are slowly withering away, their skin stretched tightly over their bones and joints. At a certain point, our raft was no longer capable of transporting us further due to the fact that we were taking on water faster than our guide could bail us out, and the way the locals had jimmy-rigged the entire village in order to continue going about their daily lives. We docked at what seemed to be just a tree at first glance, but a closer look showed that there was a small plank rested on floating tires meeting the tip of the raft and a man standing in the water next to it, inviting us to step aboard. With no where to go but forward, we couldn't help but laugh as we shuffled across a large system of balance beams forking out in every direction. We finally reached the dock, safe and dry, and boarded a larger boat to set off into the lake.

City Sidewalks

City Sidewalks

On the outskirts of the lake, we passed through a floating village. Houses and schools that are typically raised up on 10 meter stilts were now completely inundated in water equally as deep, if not more. Instead of cars and motor-scooters, the people got around by small wooden boats. As we passed through, I absorbed the sights, awe-struck. I couldn't help but admire the true strength of these villagers who faced such adversity, but instead of fleeing or just giving up, they found ways to deal with the situation they were put in. Chickens and pigs were kept in floating corrals made of bamboo, clothing and dishes were washed in the water, children swam and boated in the canal passing between the homes, large nets were strung up to bamboo poles jutting out from the water and atop the nets were thousands of shrimp, drying in the hot sun, and front 'yards' had been turned into large fishing farms.

A day at the market

A day at the market

We had lunch at a floating restaurant then headed back to the dock, crossed the planks once more, and took the raft back to dry land. We spent the rest of the afternoon viewing more ancient temples (most of them over 1000 years old), then too a ride in a cart pulled by cows. We finished the day with a ride up in a hot air balloon to get a bird's eye view of the ancient cities, then back to the hotel for a swim and a 2 hour massage.

bird's eye view

bird's eye view

Can't wait to see what adventures I have in store for me in Phnom Penh!

  • **************

Advice of the day: There is a solution to every problem, you just need a little faith and ingenuity :)
Food of the day: Crocodile! BBQd it myself!
Word of the day: "Soo si Dae!" meaning "hello!" in Khmer (Cambodian)
Local interaction of the day: when we entered one of the temples we noticed a small boy taking our pictures, but thought nothing of it at the time. As we were leaving the temples, two young girls ran up to us trying to sell us souvenir plates. We politely said no thank you, but they were tenacious as always, and put them in our faces. Only then did we realizes that we were staring back at our own faces, which had been imprinted into the center of the plates. ....sorry to spoil your Christmas presents grandma and grandpa! ;p

Posted by Abroadabroad89 02:24 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

Getting Acclimated

"You must be shapeless, formless, like water. When you pour water in a cup, it becomes the cup...When you pour water in a teapot, it becomes the teapot. Water can drip and it can crash. Become like water my friend." -Bruce Lee

sunny 36 °C

The days are all starting to blur together and I am never quite sure what day it is from one to the next, so I have just been going by how it feels. For example, today feels like Sunday so I decided that it was Sunday. It turned out that it is actually Thursday, but it may as well be Sunday anyway, so no matter. Even all of the foods, shopping stores and sights are becoming rather redundant and I can no longer tell one from the next. Dad joked that Temples in South East Asia are the Churches of Europe. If you have seen one, you have seen them all, yet still you have to see them all.

We have been gone for a week and a half now, and it is definitely starting to show. We look rough! My nails and eyebrows need work, making me miss my salon back home, and I am pretty sure we all stink. All it takes is 10 minutes under the hot sun in this humid climate to start glistening (ladies don't sweat, of course) profusely. My hair is tangled and stringy from the harsh, unpurified water, and lack of conditioner (my fault for being careless and not thinking to pack it). I now understand why most of the other foreign travelers we pass (especially the hostel backpackers) wear dreads. On the other hand, my skin has become slightly sun-kissed, much to my delight (which is not a concept the locals understand, as they go to extra measures to cover their skin in order to keep it light). I have also purchased some of the local garb (when in Rome), which is looser and breathes better, and consequently have taken on a more bohemian look. It is starting to really grow on me, though at times I feel like one of the regulars you would find at 'occupy DC' ...but here, it is acceptable. And cozy! My parents fear I will return home next year with dreads, tattoos and extra piercings... And a liberal, to add insult to injury.

As pleasing as the local food is to my palate, it is also very rich and my stomach is taking its time adjusting. I won't give up! I read a quote by James Michener that said, "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay at home."  This holds real truth to it, and I took it to heart. After all, you don't go to Egypt, not to see the pyramids and you don't go to a pub in Ireland and order a bud light. Otherwise, why bother at all. That's this traveller's opinion, at least. 
I also only buy what I know I will finish. Back home, it was easy to take for granted all that I had. I would often throw out an unfinished meal, simply because I was too full, or in too much of a rush. Here, I find myself thinking twice about every item of food put in front of me.  I often end up eating, in full, food that I don't completely enjoy, or food that seems questionable, because I have learned how lucky I am to even have it offered to me in the first place. On average, the locals make $1 a day and do not always have the blessing of a filling meal from day to day, so I do not feel right allowing any food to go to waste (as much as my stomach will hate me for it later).

Off to Phnom Penh!

Posted by Abroadabroad89 19:49 Archived in Cambodia Comments (1)

Holiday in Cambodia

"It's tough kid, but it's life"

sunny 35 °C

Thus far, today was the best day of our entire trip!

We are now in Siem Reap, Cambodia (only 4 hours away from my semi-final destination, yikes!) and it is truly a tropical oasis. The weather is wonderful, and our hotel is enclosed in palm trees, with a spa and an open terrace dining room over looking an inviting outdoor swimming pool, complete with a waterfall.

hidden civilization

hidden civilization

Today we drove 4 kilometers up the road to see Angkor Wat, the largest temple in the world, buried in the jungle of Cambodia, and Angkor Thom, a vast ancient royal city, now in ruins. Both having been perceived to be only a myth until their discovery by a French explorer in the 19th century.
Angkor Thom was a marvel to behold. Hidden in the trees and brush for centuries, the sandstone structures blend in beautifully with the surrounding nature. Moss grows on most of the pillars, and statues boast the faces of Buddhist and Hindu Gods as well as ancient mythical creatures which are believed to ward off the evil spirits from entering the temple gates. 300 year old trees grow up through the walls, with roots fat as elephant legs, serpentining around crumbling archways and jutting out through the ceilings and floors. The trees soar into the sky, towering over the lost civilization, and, breaking the otherwise quiescent setting, monkey scream and frolic in the branches, their own personal playground hundreds of feet above the jungle floor. Old sandstone blocks and dilapidated statues lay in piles all over the landscape, waiting for restoration archeologists to put them back in their place, and swamp puddles litter the walkways, leftover from recent floods.

angkor thom

angkor thom


amazing roots

amazing roots


peeking

peeking

We walked the ruins for hours, climbing crumbling staircases to the tops of palaces and temples. Finally reaching the top of Angkor Wat as the sun was beginning to set, I looked over the terrace and could see for miles. A seemingly endless sea of lakes and trees. I could have stayed there all night, if not for the creeping hunger in my stomach and the throbbing aches in my feet, knees and thighs (and of course the fact that the temple closes at dusk).

angkor wat

angkor wat


top of the temple

top of the temple

We said goodbye to Angkor Wat, hoping to meet again someday, and took our Tuk Tuk (a small cart pulled by a moped and the common taxi in Siem Reap) back to the hotel where I swam a few laps in the pool to cool off in the warm night air, relaxed to an hour long aroma therapy massage, then headed out to town for Cambodian BBQ.

A perfect day.

  • ****************

Advice of the day: If you build it, they will come.
Food of the day: Amok - a traditional Cambodia dish of fish mixed with vegetables, lemongrass and coconut milk. Om nom nomm!
Word of the day: "Arkon Chiran" meaning, "Thank you very much" in Cambodian
Local interaction of the day:
Young Cambodian girl - "Madame, you buy 10 bracelets for $1"
Mom (shaking her head, while getting into Tuk Tuk) - "Arkon, no thank you"
Girl-"Oh, where you from? I know Washington D.C."
Mom-"I'm from Washington D.C.!"
Girl-"Oh! You look like Michelle Obama!"
........our Tuk Tuk pulls away and Mom and I bust out laughing, and together blurt out "That's going in the Blog!"

Posted by Abroadabroad89 03:19 Archived in Cambodia Comments (1)

Today, I saw Never Land

"Second star to the right and straight on till morning" -Peter Pan

photo 1

photo 1


never never land

never never land

Posted by Abroadabroad89 18:17 Archived in Vietnam Comments (0)

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